McNeil Labradors


Your Puppy’s First Night

Your puppy has been with his littermates in a puppy play pen, however, he probably hasn't slept in a crate.  The puppy playpen is very similar to a crate except for the absence of his littermates.  It is a good idea to let him sleep in his crate and follow the issues prescribed in the Crate Training Article.  This is for the puppy’s protection and your peace of mind.  If he is whining or barking when he should be sleeping, he may quiet down on his own if left alone. 

Sometimes a puppy will miss the warmth and companionship of his mother or siblings.  Leaving a radio on near the puppy might help.  Also, a loud ticking clock nearby will sometimes help the puppy through those first few nights.  Ideally, in your bedroom, next to your bed is the best place for the puppy.

Before you take your puppy home from the breeder, take a few towels with you and put them in with the litter.  You can put one of the towels with your puppy in the crate.  The scent of the litter on a towel may be comforting to your puppy for the first few nights until the adjustment is made from littermates to new home and new crate!   

Please do not isolate the puppy as this only makes it worse to teach him to be alone in the future.  The best method for preventing night trauma is to put the puppy in a crate and allow him to sleep in your bedroom.  If he starts to whine and becomes restless, a tap on the top of the crate with a gentle “NO” or “QUIET” works well.  This works because the puppy wants the security of being with you.  In the long run, you’ll get more sleep if you follow this suggestion.

McNeil Labradors
Mooresville, NC 28117
 
 
 
 

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Last Updated:  January 29, 2008

© Copyright 2001 - 2008 by Margo Carter, McNeil Labradors, All Rights Reserved.
Page Created By:  Margo Carter, McNeil Labradors

  Thought For The Day:

"We give dogs time we can spare, space we can
spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's
the best deal man has ever made." - M. Facklam